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Bonnie Raitt + Adam Douglas

Adam Douglas, the unassuming American who ended up winning NRK’s Stjernekamp in 2017, provides a perfect sparring partner for Raitt this evening. The 36-year-old represents a new generation of musicians, but shares many of his roots with his guitar sister. It’s a tricky task to place people like Adam Douglas in a particular genre, and it’s still worse to ask him to so himself. He gets inspiration from pop, soul, blues and country, intermixed with lots of vocals, guitar, choir and preferably with a separate wind section. It was during a car trip with his mother and father that he first discoverd soul music. – Aretha Franklin’s Respect came on the radio, and I had never heard anything like it before. I completely fell in love with that music. Because soul can communicate feelings in the text. It’s a totally different way of singing. You must transmit what lies inside you. It feels quite natural for me, that’s how I experience music. It was in 2017 that Adam Douglas was to make the transition from the shadows into main stream. Every Saturday, he met new musical challenges in Sjernekamp, and ended up winning the whole competition. – I had nothing to lose. I was unknown and thought that I could possibly take part for a couple of weeks and learn a bit. But I never imagined that I could hold out to the end. I’ve learned an incredible amount. It made me a better performer and more confident on stage. It was so intense, and I had to concentrate. But it was also great fun, I learned that I can probably manage more than I thought I could. One way in which Adam differs from previous winners is that he sang his own song in the final, and won, not be interpreting other styles, but by being himself. – That’s what people liked. I’m completely honest. Always. I never try to be someone I’m not. I’m just Adam Douglas, perhaps with a new hat from time to time.



American blues-rock legend Bonnie Raitt is coming to Trondheim for the very first time! And to Norway for the first time in 13 years. Bonnie Raitt has won 10 Grammys, she has been inducted into

The Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame, and she is on the Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 50 all time best songs. She is also on the list of the world’s greatest gitarists.

Bonnie Raitt’s father was John Raitt, star of Broadway musicals, and her mother was a pianist. Bonnie was rasied as a Quaker, a religious tradition concerned with rediscovering the orignal Christianity, without the help of either clergy or spiritual cermonies. But for Bonnie, Quaker traditions were more political than religious.

At 20 she started on African studies at Harvard University. She wanted to travel to Tanzania to repair the damage caused by western colonialism. But she suddenly became caught up in music and took a free year to tour with none other than the Rolling Stones.

She never returned to the university, but has never relinguished her political commitment. Bonne Raitt was one of the founders of the anti-nuclear organisation MUSE. She participated both in the album No Nukes and in the anti-apartheid album Sun City. She has played for Amnesty International and several other organisations, and on her homepage she urges everyone to learn more about how to protect the global environment.

Bonnie Raitt has worked with numerous international celebreties, and has sung duets with John Lee Hooker, Alicia Keys, Willie Nelson, Aretha Franklin and Ray Charles, to mention just a few. She also contributes to Mavis Staples’ new album. Bonnie Raitt’s most recent album, Dig Deep (2016), got marvelous reviews and is a brilliant blues-rock album. We can certainly look forward to an extremely enjoyable and meaningful evening in The Archbishop’s Courtyard on Wednesday 1. August, 2018.

Adam Douglas, the unassuming American who ended up winning NRK’s Stjernekamp in 2017, provides a perfect sparring partner for Raitt this evening.

The 36-year-old represents a new generation of musicians, but shares many of his roots with his guitar sister. It’s a tricky task to place people like Adam Douglas in a particular genre, and it’s still worse to ask him to so himself. He gets inspiration from pop, soul, blues and country, intermixed with lots of vocals, guitar, choir and preferably with a separate wind section. It was during a car trip with his mother and father that he first discoverd soul music.

– Aretha Franklin’s Respect came on the radio, and I had never heard anything like it before. I completely fell in love with that music. Because soul can communicate feelings in the text. It’s a totally different way of singing. You must transmit what lies inside you. It feels quite natural for me, that’s how I experience music.

It was in 2017 that Adam Douglas was to make the transition from the shadows into main stream. Every Saturday, he met new musical challenges in Sjernekamp, and ended up winning the whole competition.

– I had nothing to lose. I was unknown and thought that I could possibly take part for a couple of weeks and learn a bit. But I never imagined that I could hold out to the end. I’ve learned an incredible amount. It made me a better performer and more confident on stage. It was so intense, and I had to concentrate. But it was also great fun, I learned that I can probably manage more than I thought I could.

One way in which Adam differs from previous winners is that he sang his own song in the final, and won, not be interpreting other styles, but by being himself.

– That’s what people liked. I’m completely honest. Always. I never try to be someone I’m not. I’m just Adam Douglas, perhaps with a new hat from time to time.

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